December 21st, 2008

twins

In the library

Today was an interesting day in the materials center (aka the library). We noticed we weren't the first ones to get there, which wouldn't have been an issue except that there were no librarians. Just someone getting chalk. Thankfully, he knew that he needed to sign it out whether there was a librarian there or not, and that's what he was doing. Unfortunately for the girl who got there and left before we did, she did not know that she needed to sign out the pictures she took, so she got in a little bit of trouble when she came to return them. Eheh. Sometimes, I think maybe we're too strict, but later we were shown another example of why things really need to be organized in the library, and thus our resolve to make sure people follow the right procedures (which really are not as bureaucratic as one might think--you just have to write your name and what you took so we know where it is!).

That example: the entire box of scissors was gone. Or so we thought. Someone came asking to use some scissors, and the box was not where it should have been, nor was it anywhere in sight. It wasn't until I was pacing around later (though I was frustrated, I actually pace every week because it keeps me busy) that I discovered the box of scissors hidden on a shelf behind the overhead projector. So actually it wasn't a problem of not being checked out. That came later when someone needed some sheet music that wasn't in the folder it was supposed to be in.

Anyway, as we were ranting and raving about people not respecting the library rules, the Relief Society president from the ward that meets after ours came in to get copies made like she does every week. She was sympathetic, which was nice. She also told us that the librarian from her ward told her not to let us make her copies, but to always have him do it. I can understand why he would be mad at us, because I'm a smart-aleck and he's the type that doesn't like to deal with that. Last week's example: stuff keeps piling up in the lost and found, and he likes to stay busy, so one of the things he does is look through all the stuff and see if he can figure out who it belongs to. This sometimes involves going through the lost things looking for a name. I guess I was just feeling contrary, because I chose not to hold in my comment of, "Some people might consider that an invasion of privacy." His answer was that he's a custodian and this is how he does things at work, and that way he sometimes can return stuff to its owners. Fair enough. My personal opinion is that if they cared little enough about it to lose it and not notice it was gone, it's probably not that private and they can just deal with someone looking through it, so you can see I was really just being a brat. And thus I learn to work harder on not being a brat.

The other lesson is if you're going to do a job, do it right, because the Relief Society president from his ward said she would not stop asking us to make her copies--why should she, when we do such a good job? So yay for people standing up for us!

Inbetween our library adventures, we of course had our own ward's Relief Society. This week, they ended the lesson early so they could read the Christmas story from a pretty picture book. And after that, they told us about the little stockings they had set out for each of us to take. Each one had a slip of paper with a reminder not to forget the person whose birthday we're celebrating, asking us to write down a gift we want to give the Savior over the next year. Kind of like a New Year's resolution, I guess. The idea is to write down some way you plan to improve yourself and get closer to Christ. I think the story of the other ward's librarian has given me my answer, so that's one thing I'll be working on.

Changing the subject completely, I was thinking that there's someone out there who's asked us about the possibility of translating a certain manga for her. Since we don't have any work this week, if that person is still interested, we might be able to work on that for her, though I'm not sure if we can make any guarantees. But anyway, we think there's a possibility of a work explosion in January, so this is probably the best chance you're going to get. But we do have plenty to do, so if you don't care anymore, we'll probably just do all that other stuff.

Today I'm thankful for getting cookies in Relief Society, people standing up for us, impromptu fanfares, getting to sing Christmas songs in church today, and the kind service of our old bishopric.